Documentaries About Philippines

Top 5 Documentaries About Philippines

In this article, we'll explore the top 5 Documentaries About Philippines

Intro: Documentaries About Philippines

The documentaries, which last an average of 27 minutes, are available on ICHCAP's official YouTube channel in two versions: one in English (with English subtitles) and the other in Korean subtitles. They're part of ICHCAP's audiovisual record of the Asia-Pacific ICH project. ICH components "are some of the most significant variables in forming civilization and culture," according to Roel Hoang Manipon, the principal writer of documentaries as well as the filmmaker and co-director of numerous of them.

"Traditions or living expressions inherited from our ancestors and passed on to our descendants, such as oral traditions, performing arts, social practices, rituals, festive events, knowledge, and practices concerning nature and the universe, or the knowledge and skills to produce traditional crafts," according to UNESCO.

The UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage is promoted by ICHCAP, which is based in Jeonju, Korea, and contributes to its implementation throughout the Asia-Pacific area. From 2015 to 2017, the ICH video documentation project was undertaken in four Central Asian nations and Mongolia. For the second phase of the project, ICHCAP chose Southeast Asia, starting with four countries: Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia. ICHCAP collaborated with the Official Commission for Cultural and the Arts (NCCA), the Philippines' national arts and culture body.

1. The History Of The Philippines - Documentaries About Philippines

In 1521, Ferdinand Magellan, a Portuguese navigator travelling for Spain, claimed the Philippines for Spain, naming the islands after King Philip II of Spain. They were known as Las Felipinas at the time. By the 1830s, Spanish culture and ideology had permeated Filipino society, where Filipinos began to consider independence from Spain. Spain's government promoted Filipino agriculture to the point of self-sufficiency.

After a few failed efforts at independence and a slew of Spanish atrocities, Filipino nationalists began to speak out. Jose Rizal was a well-known figure at the time. He went to the University of Santo Tomas in the Philippines and Madrid to study medicine. Rizal published two essential books that depicted Spanish authority injustices. Despite being prohibited, the novels were smuggled into the Philippines and extensively read. Rizal declared the Philippines "the Pearl of the Oriental Seas" on his execution, December 30, 1896. His death is celebrated on December 30 every year.

2. World’s Most Dangerous Roads - Philippines Documentary

The Halsema Route (also known as the Benguet–Mountain Province Road, the Baguio–Bontoc Road, or the Mountain Trail) is a Philippine national secondary highway. It runs from the city limit of Baguio to the municipality of Bontoc in northern Luzon and is part of the Cordillera Central range.  Its highest point is in the city of Atok, at 7,400 feet (2,300 meters) above sea level.  It was officially acknowledged as the Philippines' most elevated highway until 2019 when the 2,428.66 m (7,968.0 ft) high point Kiangan–Tinoc–Buguias Road in Tinoc, Ifugao was named the new holder.

The 150-kilometer (93.2-mile) roadway runs through Benguet province for 95 kilometers (59 miles) and passes through eight municipalities (La Trinidad, Tublay, Atok, Bokod, Kabayan, Buguias, Bakun, and Mankayan). It also includes four towns in the Mountain Province (Bauko, Sabangan, Bontoc, and Sagada). [8] When you get to the settlement of Dantay in Bontoc, the route splits in two. The one route leads to downtown Bontoc, while the other travels to Sagada, which is 29 kilometers (18.0 miles) away.

3. Life In Manila Slums! Don't Come Here - Documentaries About Philippines

The administration of Manila has worked to find measures to reduce poverty and the number of people living in slums, yet poverty is a drain on the city's economy. According to the Asian Development Bank, for every 1% rise in poverty, overall per capita income decreases by 0.7 per cent. Along with this economic formula, slum communities' economic growth is hampered by a lack of investment, money, and financial markets. Various non-governmental groups, such as Habitat for Humanity and Project PEARLS, provide necessities and practical support to those living in slums. Nonetheless, to reduce and address the ten facts above about slums in Manila, the Philippines needed further study and local and foreign support.The administration of Manila has worked to find measures to reduce poverty and the number of people living in slums, yet poverty is a drain on the city's economy. According to the Asian Development Bank, for every 1% rise in poverty, overall per capita income decreases by 0.7 per cent. Along with this economic formula, slum communities' economic growth is hampered by a lack of investment, money, and financial markets. Various non-governmental groups, such as Habitat for Humanity and Project PEARLS, provide necessities and practical support to those living in slums. Nonetheless, to reduce and address the ten facts above about slums in Manila, the Philippines needed further study and local and foreign support.

The administration of Manila has worked to find measures to reduce poverty and the number of people living in slums, yet poverty is a drain on the city's economy. According to the Asian Development Bank, for every 1% rise in poverty, overall per capita income decreases by 0.7 per cent. Along with this economic formula, slum communities' economic growth is hampered by a lack of investment, money, and financial markets. Various non-governmental groups, such as Habitat for Humanity and Project PEARLS, provide necessities and valuable support to those living in slums.

4. No-Go Zones: World’s Toughest Places, Quirino -  Philippines Documentary

Following the massive success of Behind Bars: The World's Toughest Prisons, this series delves into what it's like to be a part of some of the world's most notorious and deadly microcosms: extremely criminal hoods, weapon markets, red-light districts...

From the terrifying no-go zone of Ghost Town, South Africa, to Tepito City, Mexico's most violent black market, the audience will stroll and chat with the individuals who are part of the very illegal game that genuinely rules them. For them, the streets, corners, bars, and jails are both homes and places where they live. Prostitutes, drug dealers, gang members, and police officers all confront unique hurdles in their fight to stay alive... There are six nations in all. Six of the world's most challenging locations. Find out what it takes to make it through these infamous No-Go Zones.

5. Aurora Province: The Treasure of the Philippines - Documentaries About Philippines

Aurora (Tagalog: Lalawigan ng Aurora; Ilocano: Probinsia ti Aurora) is a Philippine province in the Philippines' Central Luzon area, overlooking the Philippine Sea. Its capital is Baler, and it borders the provinces of Quezon, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, Nueva Vizcaya, Quirino, and Isabela clockwise from the south.

Aurora was a part of the province of Quezon. Aurora's early history is intertwined with the provinces of Quezon and Nueva Ecija, when the territory was ruled as the District of El Principe. The area was detached from Nueva Ecija in 1902 and annexed to Tayabas province (now Quezon)was named after Aurora Aragon, the wife of Philippine Commonwealth President Manuel L. Quezon. She was also the name of the mother province.

Documentaries about Philippines: Conclusions

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