Voodoo Documentary

Voodoo Documentaries: Top 4 Documentaries about Voodoo

In this article, we'll explore the top 4 Voodoo Documentary

Intro: Voodoo Documentary

An all-Black company performed a rendition of William Shakespeare's "Macbeth" in 1936 Harlem, dubbed "Voodoo Macbeth." Last weekend, the 27th annual Sedona International Film Festival awarded a new biopic about the production with the same title, Best of Fest.

The legendary play reimagines the ancient Scottish tale. The film shows Orson Welles' dramatic interplay with theatre moguls, the acting company, producers, journalists, patrons, and the audience as a 20-year-old novice director.

1. Voodoo Mysteries - Documentaries about Voodoo

Santeria, Voodoo, and Obeah secrets are among the world's oldest mysteries. Their ancestors may be traced back to prehistoric Africa and possibly farther. The slave trade carried these old secrets to the West from the 16th century onwards, where they oddly mingled with orthodox Christianity: ancient African gods became equated with legendary saints. This gradual blending of the two faiths gave rise to the numerous variants of Santeria, Obeah, and Voudoun that are now extensively practised worldwide. Their distinctive drumming and dance appear to induce odd states of mind in which practically anything is imaginable.

Even legends of zombies (the wandering dead) continue to circulate. Is there a logical reason for them? Voudoun priests, priestesses, magicians, and enchanters of today utilize rare plants and spices, as well as charms, dolls, and talismans, to manipulate the natural world in ways that science cannot always explain. The accounts of their unexplainable achievement are dissected in great detail. The claims claimed for their love philtres and aphrodisiacs are the most interesting of all. What abilities do these ancient faiths still have?

2. Voodoo Spirits of Haiti - Voodoo Documentary

The law is the mediator between humanity and Bondyé, a transcendent creator god in Haitian Vodou. Over a thousand lwa are believed to exist by vodouists, with the names of at least 232 of them documented. Each lwa has its personality and is linked to specific colours and items. Based on comparable features or standard symbols, several of them are compared to certain Roman Catholic saints. The lwa are separated into nanchon (nations), with the Petwo and Rada being the most noteworthy. The lwa, according to the Vodou religion, interact with people through dreams and divination and are compensated with sacrifices, including sacrificial animals.

According to Vodou, the lwa possess certain practitioners during rituals, known as the chwal (horse) of the lwa during the possession. Vodouists believe that by inhabiting a person, the lwa may speak with other humans, delivering counsel, warning, or healing.

3. Voodoo Mounted By The Gods - Documentaries about Voodoo

Alberto Venzago, a well-known Swiss photographer, directed this documentary.

He has been photographing a youngster who has been chosen to become a voodoo priest for ten years. Wim Wenders' mighty and exquisite picture, with Kit Hopkins' script and Jochen Schmidt-soundtrack. Hambrock's.

Voodoo, like Christianity and Islam, is a legally recognized religion in Benin. Alberto Venzago, a photographer and filmmaker, spent ten years researching its history and traditions. His film follows Gounon, a little boy: Kidnapped as a youngster, he enters the deity Mawu-monastery Lisa's at the age of twelve as the Chosen One, where he is groomed as the next best Benin Voodoo priest. The black-and-white, shimmering pictures of the documentary transformed into a journey between trance and reality that raises more questions than it answers.

4. The Mysterious Voodoo Communities Of Benin - Voodoo Documentary

OUIDAH, BENIN - JANUARY 11: An 'Egungun' ghost stands during a Voodoo ceremony in Ouidah, Benin on January 11, 2012. The Egungun are masqueraded dancers who symbolize the Yoruba, a Nigerian ethnic group, who are thought to visit Earth to possess and guide the living. Ouidah is the Voodoo stronghold of Benin, and is regarded to be the spiritual home of Voodoo, or Vodun as it is called in Benin. Voodoo, shrouded in mystery and sometimes misunderstood, was recognized as an official religion in Benin in 1989 and is growing in popularity, with around 17% of the population practicing it. A week of activities centered on Voodoo worship culminates on January 10th, when people from all over Benin, as well as Togo and Nigeria, descend on the town for the annual Voodoo festival.

Voodoo Documentary: Conclusion

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Images credits: Unsplash.com